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Email:

sales.teatrails@resplendentceylon.com

 
Telephone

(+94)11 774 5700

Lines are open between 8:30am - 5:00pm [GMT +5.5]

 
Mobile

(+94)77 786 7350

Fax

(+94) 11 774 5731



Colombo Office
Tea Trails Ltd
46/38 Nawam Mawatha
Colombo 2
Sri Lanka


Bungalow Contacts

Norwood
Summerville
+94 51 738 8400
+94 51 738 8402
Castlereagh
Tientsin
+94 51 738 8401
+94 51 738 8403

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Ceylon Tea Country

The English and Scottish planters who created “a little bit of England” in Ceylon’s “upcountry” to make way for the island’s tea plantations have long gone but their legacy of meticulously managed tea gardens and the good planters’ life is alive and well at the four luxurious Tea Trails bungalows in the Bogawantalawa Valley.

 

These hardy Englishmen and Scotsmen braved long and arduous steamship journeys, sailing across the Indian Ocean to arrive on the shores of Ceylon, eager to exploit the island’s extraordinarily benevolent climate and rich soil.

 

In their inimitable way, British planters rewarded themselves for the backbreaking work of creating first coffee and then tea plantations in the mountain highlands of Sri Lanka by also creating a comfortable lifestyle that is memorable and unique. The tea planters’ way of life in Sri Lanka is perhaps one of the few aspects of island life that remains unchanged, offering a glimpse of a bygone era amidst the pristine natural surroundings and the unchanged rhythms of a tea estate.

 

Plantation bungalows were generally sprawling colonial structures, with deep bay windows, elegant furniture, roaring wood fires and delectable cuisine turned out by a jealously guarded chef and a retinue of domestic staff who would often be the third or fourth generation to have worked for the same family.

 

With the groundbreaking Ceylon Tea Trails, the Dilmah Tea Company  and Bogawantalawa Tea Estates have brought to life four impeccably restored British colonial-era bungalows that have set a new trend in small luxury accommodation in Sri Lanka, winning accolades from discerning visitors in search of a unique experience.

 

Each of the four Tea Trails bungalows lies nestled among the hills of the Bogawantalawa region in the Dimbula district. It is here that the créme de la créme of Ceylon teas – the fragrant and delicately flavoured “high growns” flourish. Bogawantalawa is known as “The Golden Valley” on account of its lush, vigorous tea bushes that produce full bodied to light, delicate and fragrant teas throughout the year.

 

This is perhaps the most famous region for Ceylon Tea and one of the first areas to be planted after tea took over from coffee in Ceylon in the 1870′s. The area covers the extensive western slopes of the tea planting districts.

 

The southwest monsoon rains have a significant impact on the quality of Bogawantalawa and Dimbula teas. Cold dry weather from January to March creates the “quality season” that produces the best teas. Characteristics of the tea grown in this area include long wiry beautiful leaves that give an exquisite taste, almost oaky, with body and strength.

 

The four Tea Trails bungalows are located between 4 km and 15km from each other. Castlereagh and Summerville bungalows were built in 1925 and 1923 respectively and are located on Castlereagh Lake.

 

The original Norwood Bungalow was built in 1890 by the Eastern Produce Company and rebuilt in 1950 after the old bungalow caught fire. The original Tientsin bungalow was built where the present sundeck area is located. Planter Irwin Stuart’s mother built the present bungalow for him in 1939.

 

Other buildings of historic note are the Christ Church, Warleigh built by English and Scottish tea planters in 1878 and St. Mary’s Church where Juliet Margaret Cameron, an early pioneer of black and white photography, is buried. Two of the oldest planters clubs – the Darawella Maskeliya Cricket Club in Dickoya and the Bogawantalawa Planters Club are also of historic interest.

Ceylon Tea Country

Ceylon Tea Country

The English and Scottish planters who created “a little bit of England” in Ceylon’s “upcountry” to make way for the island’s tea plantations have long gone but their legacy of meticulously managed tea gardens and the good planters’ life is alive and well at the four luxurious Tea Trails bungalows in the Bogawantalawa Valley.

 

These hardy Englishmen and Scotsmen braved long and arduous steamship journeys, sailing across the Indian Ocean to arrive on the shores of Ceylon, eager to exploit the island’s extraordinarily benevolent climate and rich soil.

 

In their inimitable way, British planters rewarded themselves for the backbreaking work of creating first coffee and then tea plantations in the mountain highlands of Sri Lanka by also creating a comfortable lifestyle that is memorable and unique. The tea planters’ way of life in Sri Lanka is perhaps one of the few aspects of island life that remains unchanged, offering a glimpse of a bygone era amidst the pristine natural surroundings and the unchanged rhythms of a tea estate.

 

Plantation bungalows were generally sprawling colonial structures, with deep bay windows, elegant furniture, roaring wood fires and delectable cuisine turned out by a jealously guarded chef and a retinue of domestic staff who would often be the third or fourth generation to have worked for the same family.

 

With the groundbreaking Ceylon Tea Trails, the Dilmah Tea Company  and Bogawantalawa Tea Estates have brought to life four impeccably restored British colonial-era bungalows that have set a new trend in small luxury accommodation in Sri Lanka, winning accolades from discerning visitors in search of a unique experience.

 

Each of the four Tea Trails bungalows lies nestled among the hills of the Bogawantalawa region in the Dimbula district. It is here that the créme de la créme of Ceylon teas – the fragrant and delicately flavoured “high growns” flourish. Bogawantalawa is known as “The Golden Valley” on account of its lush, vigorous tea bushes that produce full bodied to light, delicate and fragrant teas throughout the year.

 

This is perhaps the most famous region for Ceylon Tea and one of the first areas to be planted after tea took over from coffee in Ceylon in the 1870′s. The area covers the extensive western slopes of the tea planting districts.

 

The southwest monsoon rains have a significant impact on the quality of Bogawantalawa and Dimbula teas. Cold dry weather from January to March creates the “quality season” that produces the best teas. Characteristics of the tea grown in this area include long wiry beautiful leaves that give an exquisite taste, almost oaky, with body and strength.

 

The four Tea Trails bungalows are located between 4 km and 15km from each other. Castlereagh and Summerville bungalows were built in 1925 and 1923 respectively and are located on Castlereagh Lake.

 

The original Norwood Bungalow was built in 1890 by the Eastern Produce Company and rebuilt in 1950 after the old bungalow caught fire. The original Tientsin bungalow was built where the present sundeck area is located. Planter Irwin Stuart’s mother built the present bungalow for him in 1939.

 

Other buildings of historic note are the Christ Church, Warleigh built by English and Scottish tea planters in 1878 and St. Mary’s Church where Juliet Margaret Cameron, an early pioneer of black and white photography, is buried. Two of the oldest planters clubs – the Darawella Maskeliya Cricket Club in Dickoya and the Bogawantalawa Planters Club are also of historic interest.

Ceylon Tea Country

Ceylon Tea Country

The English and Scottish planters who created “a little bit of England” in Ceylon’s “upcountry” to make way for the island’s tea plantations have long gone but their legacy of meticulously managed tea gardens and the good planters’ life is alive and well at the four luxurious Tea Trails bungalows in the Bogawantalawa Valley.

 

These hardy Englishmen and Scotsmen braved long and arduous steamship journeys, sailing across the Indian Ocean to arrive on the shores of Ceylon, eager to exploit the island’s extraordinarily benevolent climate and rich soil.

 

In their inimitable way, British planters rewarded themselves for the backbreaking work of creating first coffee and then tea plantations in the mountain highlands of Sri Lanka by also creating a comfortable lifestyle that is memorable and unique. The tea planters’ way of life in Sri Lanka is perhaps one of the few aspects of island life that remains unchanged, offering a glimpse of a bygone era amidst the pristine natural surroundings and the unchanged rhythms of a tea estate.

 

Plantation bungalows were generally sprawling colonial structures, with deep bay windows, elegant furniture, roaring wood fires and delectable cuisine turned out by a jealously guarded chef and a retinue of domestic staff who would often be the third or fourth generation to have worked for the same family.

 

With the groundbreaking Ceylon Tea Trails, the Dilmah Tea Company  and Bogawantalawa Tea Estates have brought to life four impeccably restored British colonial-era bungalows that have set a new trend in small luxury accommodation in Sri Lanka, winning accolades from discerning visitors in search of a unique experience.

 

Each of the four Tea Trails bungalows lies nestled among the hills of the Bogawantalawa region in the Dimbula district. It is here that the créme de la créme of Ceylon teas – the fragrant and delicately flavoured “high growns” flourish. Bogawantalawa is known as “The Golden Valley” on account of its lush, vigorous tea bushes that produce full bodied to light, delicate and fragrant teas throughout the year.

 

This is perhaps the most famous region for Ceylon Tea and one of the first areas to be planted after tea took over from coffee in Ceylon in the 1870′s. The area covers the extensive western slopes of the tea planting districts.

 

The southwest monsoon rains have a significant impact on the quality of Bogawantalawa and Dimbula teas. Cold dry weather from January to March creates the “quality season” that produces the best teas. Characteristics of the tea grown in this area include long wiry beautiful leaves that give an exquisite taste, almost oaky, with body and strength.

 

The four Tea Trails bungalows are located between 4 km and 15km from each other. Castlereagh and Summerville bungalows were built in 1925 and 1923 respectively and are located on Castlereagh Lake.

 

The original Norwood Bungalow was built in 1890 by the Eastern Produce Company and rebuilt in 1950 after the old bungalow caught fire. The original Tientsin bungalow was built where the present sundeck area is located. Planter Irwin Stuart’s mother built the present bungalow for him in 1939.

 

Other buildings of historic note are the Christ Church, Warleigh built by English and Scottish tea planters in 1878 and St. Mary’s Church where Juliet Margaret Cameron, an early pioneer of black and white photography, is buried. Two of the oldest planters clubs – the Darawella Maskeliya Cricket Club in Dickoya and the Bogawantalawa Planters Club are also of historic interest.

Ceylon Tea Country

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Tea Trails Ltd. 46/38 Nawam Mawatha, Colombo 2, Sri Lanka. +94 11 774 5700 sales.teatrails@resplendentceylon.com © 2013 Ceylon Tea Trails / BenWorldwide / Feedback

Sign up for Tea Trails
news and offers

Tea Trails Ltd. 46/38 Nawam Mawatha, Colombo 2, Sri Lanka. +94 11 774 5700 sales.teatrails@resplendentceylon.com © Ceylon Tea Trails / BenWorldwide / Feedback

Sign up for Tea Trails
news and offers

Tea Trails Ltd. 46/38 Nawam Mawatha, Colombo 2, Sri Lanka. +94 11 774 5700 sales.teatrails@resplendentceylon.com © Ceylon Tea Trails / BenWorldwide / Feedback